WELCOME HOME to WACPtv InterNetWork Conscious Content AGGREGATE ALMANAC for THE NEW AGE... LINKUPZ BELOW TO CHECK OUT THE MOST ORGANIZED SOCIAL COMMUNITY ONLINE... CHECK TO SEE HOW MANY OF YOUR FAVORITE PRESENTERS ARE ALREADY HERE... SIGNUP TO RECEIVE YOUR OWN 40 ACRES OF CYBER SPACE FREE (Mule not included)... COMING SOON: GET PAAID TO ADD CONTENT AND PROMOTE IT TO YOUR FRIENDS... THANKS 4 JOINING US... WE ARE CREATIVE PEOPLE with TRUE VISION... CLICK ON CATEGORIZED HEADINGS TO OPEN FAVORITE TOPICS....   ONLINE SINCE 4/27/2008 ... STAY TUNED: ...THANKS FOR VIEWING & SHARING! ...Need cash? Earn your first online commission in the next 15 minutes with new marketing method:...

- CATEGORIZED CLICK-LINKZ VIEWING *** VIEW 12 POWER TEAMS - HOT LINKUPZ PAGE TO ALL INTEREST TEAMS & GROUPS -

101FOOD I 202COM303CRAF404EDU505ENGINE I606FASHN707HEALTH I808PERF909 ESTATE110MONEY111REFORM I112GRAPHIC

        MOVIES & MUZIC                                    WOW - MUST WATCH!                              ALT DIRECTORY                                 NEW OPPORTUNITIES

1.0 SPACEBOOK ALMANAC. The MULTI-MEDIA INTERACTIVE AGGREGATE OF CATEGORIZED CONSCIOUS CREATIVE CONTENT & ACTIONS IN REAL-TIME..JOIN US NOW!

Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

CONNECTIONS

 GBI  UIN U2bCh  Share |

WE ARE THE DIVINE SOLUTIONS TO THE WORLD....LET OUR TRUE SPIRIT BE REVEALED TO THE WORLD!

RSS

'Half a glass of wine every day' increases breast cancer risk

That's what a report says - but we look at all the risks of breast cancer for women.

Frozen 'space sperm' passes fertility test

Viable mouse sperm stored in space gives hope for sperm banks on the Moon, a Japanese team says.

Lean-burn physiology gives Sherpas peak-performance

Nepalese mountain guides have a physiology that uses oxygen more efficiently lowlanders.

General election: Theresa May denies social care U-turn

Revised Tory plans will include an option for an "absolute limit" on total costs following criticism.

Microwave mushrooms 'to keep their goodness', scientists say

Grilling and microwaving are the best ways to cook the fungi, a Spanish study says.

Intersex patients 'routinely lied to by doctors'

Doctors in the UK routinely lied to patients with disorders of sex development known as intersex conditions, the BBC finds.

IVF treatment girl returns to Newcastle Centre for Life

"I was made out of two tiny little cells in a little glass tube," says seven-year-old Hannah.

Mental health deaths probed at Essex NHS trust

Essex police are looking into about 20 deaths, according to the mother of one of those who died.

Parkrun triumph for runner who recovered from two strokes

Ben Parker ran the Kesgrave course despite having suffered two strokes caused by a hole in his heart.

UK's first proton beam machine arrives at Newport clinic

The UK's first high-energy proton beam machine will offer treatments next year, the firm behind it says.

Cigarettes sold in plain green packs under new rules

Standardised tobacco packaging rules come into force to try to put young people off smoking.

Five tips from the ‘happiest man on earth’.

Renowned expert and author on compassion and happiness Matthieu Ricard, often called the ‘happiest man on earth', offers his five top tips for happiness.

NHS performance data delay 'disappointing', regulator says

An NHS regulator was advised against publishing performance data by the government.

More than 10,000 defibrillators in public places 'could be faulty'

Users are urged to check the devices' battery connections, which may not be working properly.

'Spice' ban one year on

It's a year since the ban on so-called legal highs, but has making it illegal stopped people from using it?

Chester hospital baby deaths to be investigated by police

Countess of Chester hospital recorded a "higher than usual" mortality rate.

Exercise programme 'can reduce concussion' in youth rugby

Strength, balance and movement exercises help teenagers avoid injury, a study says.

Beauty sleep is a real thing, research shows

People who miss out on sleep do appear less attractive to others, researchers have shown.

'Fat but fit is a big fat myth'

Researchers say being fat but medically fit does not protect people from heart disease.

NHS cyber attack: A&Es 'fully open' again

Patients are no longer being diverted away from A&E units following the cyber attack, NHS bosses say.

Badge

Loading…

Top 10 Ways to Improve Your Memory by Molly Edmonds
Email Cite Feedback Share Digg This Yahoo! Buzz StumbleUpon del.icio.us Reddit Cite This!Close
Please copy/paste the following text to properly cite this How Stuff Works article:


Edmonds, Molly. "Top 10 Ways to Improve Your Memory." 16 October 2008. HowStuffWorks.com. 23 October 2008.


Brain Pictures


Yo Oura/Riser/Getty Images
When your reminders affect your sense of fashion, it's time for some tips on improving memory. See more brain pictures.
­­The human brai­n is like a library that stock­s memories instead of books. In some ways, that makes the hippocampus, the part of the brain most involved in memory, the brain's librarian. The hippocampus has the most responsibility in this cranial library, juggling the new releases of short-term memory while cataloging materials for the permanent collection of long-term memory. It's not the only part at work, however, in storing these chapters of our lives. Different kinds of memory are stored in different areas of the brain. With such a large system, the brain needs a system of encoding and retrieving memories, something a bit more complex than the local library's Dewey Decimal System.


The brain has to be able to pull information at the drop of a hat, whether it's a fact on hold (such as a telephone number) or a dusty memory that's been sitting in storage for years (the memory of your first kiss). No one likes a library that loses books or shelves them in the wrong place. Yet sometimes we find ourselves with a very poor librarian on our hands, one that doesn't allow us to retrieve memories when we need them. Sometimes it's trivial, like when we tear apart our homes looking for glasses perched innocuously atop our heads, and sometimes these lapses in memories are more embarrassing, such as when we call a colleague "sport" because we simply can't remember his name.


Whether you're a college student studying for an important test or an aging baby boomer concerned about forgetting a recent doctor's appointment, there are a few things everyone can do to optimize the storage and checkouts in our private libraries of memories. Alert the librarian and head to the next page for the first tip.
10. Drink in Moderation
Before you settle in to read this article, you may want to get yourself a glass of wine. Surprised that such debauchery begins our list of memory improvers? Well, hear us out. Memory and alcohol have an interesting relationship.



Cheers to your health!First off, you'll notice we didn't advocate bringing the entire bottle back with you. Too much drinking handicaps the memory, as anyone who's ever woken after a binge with a fuzzy recollection of the night before can attest. And one component of a DUI test shows how overconsumption of alcohol can immediately affect the brain: Even simple mental tasks like counting backward and reciting the alphabet can become tricky under the influence. Alcohol abuse will have a negative effect on the cells of the brain related to memory.


But as long as you're not pregnant and able to maintain control of how much you drink, there's evidence that light to moderate alcohol consumption can improve memory and cognition. Though more research needs to be done, some studies have found that moderate drinkers do better on certain tests of memory and cognition than nondrinkers and heavy drinkers [sources: Victoroff, Minerd]. There may be some long-term effects as well. A French study that followed almost 4,000 people over the age of 65 found that light drinkers, who consumed up to two glasses of wine a day, were 45 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than nondrinkers [source: Victoroff].



But as we said, don't start tipping back beverages if you have certain risk factors, such as a family history of alcoholism. No one is recommending that teetotalers start drinking, either. Resveratrol, one of the flavonoids in red wine that's believed to have special benefits for blood vessels, is also in red grape juice.


If you tend to drink when you're sad, head to the next page for some information on how your blues affect your brain

Views: 40

Comment

You need to be a member of WACPtv to add comments!

Join WACPtv

© 2017   Created by TheArtiste Hassan.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service