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Events

July 2014
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Technique turns bodies 'see-through'

A newly discovered way to make entire bodies transparent could pave the way for a new generation of treatments, scientists say.

Therapies hope for major DNA project

A project aiming to revolutionise medicine by unlocking the secrets of DNA is under way in centres across England.

WHO sounds alarm over W Africa Ebola

The World Health Organization and presidents of West African nations affected by the Ebola outbreak are to announce a joint $100m response plan.

Minister wants end to animal testing

Norman Baker - the minister in charge of regulating animal experiments - tells the BBC he wants them to end.

S Leone declares Ebola emergency

Sierra Leone's president declares a public health emergency to curb the deadly Ebola outbreak and order epicentres of the disease to be quarantined.

UK border staff 'not ready' for Ebola

Immigration and customs staff feel unprepared to deal with people arriving in the UK with suspected cases of the Ebola virus, a union leader warns.

One-in-10 Welsh children is obese

Over a quarter of Welsh children starting primary school are overweight - with more than one in 10 classed as obese, say public health officials.

'E-cigs less harm than cigarettes'

An analysis of the current evidence available on e-cigarettes suggests they are safer than conventional cigarettes.

'Tape measure test' call on diabetes

People are being urged to take out the tape measure to assess their risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Drug-resistant malaria 'widespread'

Drug-resistant malaria is spreading in South East Asia, and has now reached the Cambodia-Thailand border, according to a study.

Ambulance response times concern

Welsh ambulances again fail to hit their response time targets which politicians brand a "huge concern".

England records rise in dementia

The number of people in England diagnosed with dementia rises by 62% over seven years.

Middle-aged drinking 'impairs memory'

Problem drinking in middle age doubles the risk of memory loss in later life, research suggests.

More than five-a-day 'no effect'

New research backs the five-a-day target for fruit and vegetables, but suggests eating more may have no added benefits.

Child malaria vaccine 'milestone'

Scientists say the world's first malaria vaccine provides children with continuing protection against the disease and may be in use by 2015.

Hunt warned over A&E wait statistics

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is warned by the statistics watchdog over claims about A&E waiting times in England.

'Brain hub predicts negative events'

Scientists have identified a part of the brain that may help us predict when things are about to go wrong and could play a part in depression.

Fist bumps 'cleaner than handshakes'

Scientists at Aberystwyth University in Wales have shown that more bacteria are transferred by shaking hands, than by fist-bumping or high-fiving.

'Most dangerous day of their life'

The first is the most dangerous of life

Admitting fewer patients 'won't cut costs'

The risks of a plan to admit fewer patients
By the Editors of Food Network Magazine
Posted Tue Sep 7, 2010 6:38am PDT
http://green.yahoo.com/blog/guest_bloggers/67/25-things-chefs-never...
Related topics: Food and Drink More from Guest Bloggers blog .


Do restaurants recycle the bread basket? Are most of us bad tippers? Food Network Magazine surveyed chefs across the country — anonymously — to find out everything we’ve always wanted to know.

Chefs are pickier than you think. Liver, sea urchin, tofu, eggplant, and oysters, of all things, topped the list of foods chefs hate most. Only 15% of chefs surveyed said they’d eat absolutely anything.

Still, chefs hate picky eaters.
More than 60% said requests for substitutions are annoying. Some of their biggest pet peeves: When customers pretend to be allergic to an ingredient, and when vegetarians make up rules, like “a little chicken stock is OK.”

When eating out in other restaurants, chefs say they avoid pasta and chicken.
Why?
These dishes are often the most overpriced (and least interesting) on the menu. Said one chef, “I won’t pay $24 for half a chicken breast.” Said another, “I want something I can’t make myself.”

Chefs have expensive taste.The restaurant chefs most often cited as the best in the country was The French Laundry in California’s Napa Valley. It ought to be — dinner there is $240 per person, before wine.

...and yet they like fast food.
Their favorite chain: Wendy’s. Culinary degrees aren’t necessarily the norm. Just half the chefs surveyed graduated from a cooking school. The rest got their training the old-fashioned way, by working their way up through the kitchen ranks.

Critics trump movie stars in the VIP pecking order.
A whopping 71% of chefs said they give special treatment to restaurant critics when they spot them; only 63% do the same for celebrities. Making out in the bathroom is old news. More than half of the chefs have found customers kissing — and much more — in the restaurant loo.

Roaches are more common than you think.
Yes, 75% of chefs said they’ve seen roaches in the kitchen. And yet, chefs swear their kitchens are clean. On a scale of 1 to 10, 85% of chefs ranked their kitchens an 8 or higher for cleanliness.

Only 13% of chefs have seen a cook do unsavory things to a customer’s food.
The most unbelievable tale: “Someone once ran a steak through a dishwasher after the diner sent it back twice. Ironically, the customer was happy with it then.”

Your bread basket might be recycled.
Three chefs admitted that uneaten bread from one basket goes right into another one.

Chefs work hard for low pay. The chefs we surveyed work between 60 and 80 hours a week and almost all of them work holidays. Sixty-five percent reported making less than $75,000 a year. Waiters take home an average of $662 a week, often tax free.

“Vegetarian” is open to interpretation.
About 15% of chefs said their vegetarian dishes might not be completely vegetarian. Beware if you’re one of those super-picky vegan types: One chef reported seeing a cook pour lamb’s blood into a vegan’s primavera.

Paying for a last-minute reservation probably won’t work.
Only one chef said bribes will help you score a table when the restaurant is fully booked; he suggested “promising to buy a bottle of Dom Pérignon or Opus One.” A better bet: Being buddies with the chef.

Menu “specials” are often experimental dishes.
Contrary to popular belief — that specials are just a chef’s way of using up old ingredients — most chefs said they use specials to try out new ideas or serve seasonal ingredients. Only five chefs admitted that they try to empty out the fridge with their nightly specials.

The appropriate tip is 20%...
That’s what chefs leave when they eat out, and it’s the amount they think is fair.

...unless the service is really poor.
An astounding 90% of chefs said it’s fair to penalize bad waiters with a smaller tip.

That rule about not ordering fish on Sunday might be worth following.
Several chefs warned, “We don’t get fresh deliveries on Sunday.”

Chefs hate working on New Year’s Eve more than any other holiday.
Valentine’s Day was a close second, but don’t take that to mean chefs aren’t romantic: 54% of those surveyed said they like it when couples get engaged in their restaurant.

They secretly want to be Alton or Giada.
Nearly 60% of chefs said they’d want their own cooking show.

Chefs cook when they’re sick.It’s a long-standing tradition in the restaurant industry: Cooks report to duty unless they’re practically hospitalized. Half of those we surveyed said they come to work sick, and they stay there through injuries, too. Many chefs have cut themselves on the job, gone to get stitches, and returned to work to finish out the night. Accidents definitely happen: Almost every chef we surveyed has been injured on the job in some way, and several chefs said they’re missing parts of their fingers.

The five-second rule actually applies.
A quarter of the chefs surveyed said they’d pick up food that dropped on the floor and cook it.

Your waiter is trying to influence your order.Almost every chef surveyed (95%) said he or she urges servers to steer customers toward specific dishes on the menu each night.

Restaurants mark up wine by a lot more than you might expect.Most chefs said that a bottle on their wine list costs 2½ times what the same one would cost in a wine store.

There’s a reason so many restaurants serve molten chocolate cake.
More than 75% of chefs said they take inspiration from other restaurant menus.

More from Food Network Magazine:

•Sunny's cookout with the vice president
•50 states, 50 breakfasts
•Mix-and-match crumbles
•New recipes
Check out Yahoo! Green on Twitter and Facebook.

Tags: chefs, secrets, tips

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