NEW AGE INSTITUTE               C DON'T BE SCAMMED       C POST YOUR BIZ HERE        C FOOD&GARDEN               C  POLICE 'DA POLICEE           

CLICK  < SITE MAP HERE: (SPECIAL INTEREST) GROUPS BELOW and EXPERIENCE THE 1ST INTERACTIVE WORLD ALMANAC...  2015CATALOG                 101Food I 202Com I 303Crafts I 404DataEdu I 505Engn I 606Fashn I 707Health I 808Pform I 909REsta I 110SalesFin I 111SocRef112Visual 

NOW TRENDING:... EBOLA. NOT!.....SUBSCRIBE 2 VIDEO MAG"'DEAR WHITE PEOPLE' MOVIE ... ...... ALL ABOUT CRYSTALS....HIGH FRUCTOSE ALERT.... LATEST INVENTIONS! ...DEPOPULATION OR GENOCIDE?,,....

Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

CONNECTIONS

 GBI  UIN U2bCh  Share |

WE ARE THE DIVINE SOLUTIONS TO THE WORLD....LET OUR TRUE SPIRIT BE REVEALED TO THE WORLD!

MEMBER AD SPACE AVAILABLE: wacptv@yahoo.com 

WACPtv: THIS IS THE PLACE TO BE... IN TUNE WITH YOURSELF TOTALLY!

http://wacptv.ning.com/main/search/search?q=image+designers

Badge

Loading…

Events

October 2014
SMTWTFS
1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031
       

RSS

Ebola outbreak cases pass 10,000

The number of cases in the Ebola outbreak passes 10,000, with 4,922 deaths, the World Health Organization's latest report says.

Jones 'not afraid' of NHS scrutiny

First Minister Carwyn Jones tells Radio 4's Any Questions he is not afraid of scrutiny of the NHS in Wales.

Cancer-killing cells made in the lab

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have discovered a way of turning stem cells into killing machines to fight brain cancer.

Ashya's family 'unsafe for UK return'

The family of Ashya King say they will not yet return to the UK following his treatment in Prague as they do not feel safe to do so.

First transplant of 'dead' heart

Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".

'Sunshine can slow weight gain'

Exposure to sunshine could slow down weight gain and the development of diabetes, research on mice suggests.

Roman gums 'healthier than ours'

People living in Roman Britain had healthier gums than their modern-day descendants, a feat of archaeological dentistry shows.

Ebola blood-therapy team set up

An international team of scientists is set up to determine the effectiveness of using the blood of Ebola-survivors as a treatment.

US 'probes hackable' medical devices

US government investigators are looking into about two dozen cases of medical kit suspected to be vulnerable to life-threatening hacks.

Later sunsets 'make kids more active'

Moving the clocks forward by one extra hour all year could lead to children getting two more minutes of exercise every day, say UK researchers.

NHS 'needs extra cash and overhaul'

The NHS in England needs extra money and drastic changes to the way services are organised if patient care is not to suffer, health bosses say.

Experts aim to reduce stillbirths

Health experts launch a five-year programme that aims to halve the number of stillbirths, newborn deaths and baby brain injuries in the UK.

NHS acting as 'barrier to families'

The NHS in England is told to stop being a barrier to infertile couples having children, according to the funding watchdog.

'More to do' on disabled hate crimes

Hate crime convictions are at an all-time high, but disability hate crime convictions have dropped, according to a new report.

'Nine million have TB' - WHO report

The World Health Organization revises its estimate as to how many people have tuberculosis up by 500,000, in its latest report into the killer disease.

NICE conflicts of interests claim

A group of leading doctors and researchers has called on MPs to investigate potential conflicts of interest at the medicines watchdog, NICE.

Scans reveal cause of winter blues

Scientists say they have identified the underlying reason why some people are prone to the winter blues, or seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

Fly genes hold clue to human illness

Scientists sequence the entire genome of the common housefly in a bid to find cures for human diseases.

Suspended between life and death

The wards full of patients suspended between life and death

Ebola: Why is it this disease we fear?

Why does Ebola cause more concern than other deadly diseases?

Volume 10, Number 11 September 1, 2007

The Farmer

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Beware of High-fructose Corn Syrup

by Dr. Ridgely Abdul Mu’min Muhammad

According to an August 23, 2007 report from the American Chemical Society researchers have found new evidence that soft drinks sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) may contribute to the development of diabetes, particularly in children. In the current study, Chi-Tang Ho, Ph.D., conducted chemical tests among 11 different carbonated soft drinks containing HFCS. He found 'astonishingly high' levels of reactive carbonyls in those beverages. These undesirable and highly-reactive compounds associated with "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules are believed to cause tissue damage, says Ho, a professor of food science at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. By contrast, reactive carbonyls are not present in table sugar, whose fructose and glucose components are "bound" and chemically stable, the researcher notes.

HFCS is a sweetener found in many foods and beverages, including non-diet soda pop, baked goods, and condiments. It is has become the sweetener of choice for many food manufacturers because it is considered more economical, sweeter and more easy to blend into beverages than table sugar. The long standing boycott of Cuban cane sugar combined with the annual corn subsidy to U.S. farmers of over $10 billion explains why sugar costs more than corn fructose.

The figures from the USDA for 2003 are that the average world price of refined sugar is 11 cents per pound compared to 28 cents in the U.S.--more than twice as much due to subsidies and import quotas. Meanwhile, the price of HFCS is 14 cents per pound. However, corn prices are expected to rise because of corn increased use as a source of energy through ethanol production. This price rise plus new evidence of the dangers of HFCS may finally force the processing industry to cut back on its widespread use.

The process for making the sweetener high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) out of corn was developed in the 1970s. Use of HFCS grew rapidly, from less than three million short tons in 1980 to almost 8 million short tons in 1995. During the late 1990s, use of sugar actually declined as it was eclipsed by HFCS. Today Americans consume more HFCS than sugar.

From zero, the average consumption of HFCS in the U.S. has risen to over 60 pounds per person per year, on average. Starting in the early 1970’s, there has been a dramatic rise in the U.S. in the rate of obesity and its related ailments including type-2 diabetes and heart disease. This alarming development coincides almost exactly with the introduction and subsequent ramp-up of consumption of High Fructose Corn Syrup. An estimated 16 million Americans have type-2 diabetes, making it the sixth leading cause of death overall. Studies have linked a high intake of refined carbohydrates such as fructose with a high "glycemic index" to the development of diabetes.

The processing industry argues that fructose is just another form of sugar and does no more damage than sugar. However, High Fructose Corn Syrup is an extremely refined version of the fructose naturally occurring in nature. High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is produced by processing corn starch to yield glucose, and then processing the glucose to produce a high percentage of fructose. Three different enzymes, two of which have been genetically modified, are needed to break down cornstarch, which is composed of chains of glucose molecules of almost infinite length, into the simple sugars glucose and fructose.

A team of investigators at the USDA, led by Dr. Meira Field, compared the effects of sugar and fructose on laboratory rats according to the www.longlife.com article entitled "Should You Boycott High Fructose Corn Syrup?" This article points out that sucrose is composed of glucose and fructose. When sugar is given to rats in high amounts, the rats develop multiple health problems, especially when the rats were deficient in certain nutrients, such as copper.

The researchers wanted to know whether it was the fructose or the glucose moiety that was causing the problems. So they repeated their studies with two groups of rats, one given high amounts of glucose and one given high amounts of fructose. The glucose group was unaffected but the fructose group had disastrous results. The male rats did not reach adulthood. They had anemia, high cholesterol and heart hypertrophy--that means that their hearts enlarged until they exploded. They also had delayed testicular development. Dr. Field explains that fructose in combination with copper deficiency in the growing animal interferes with collagen production. In a nutshell, the little bodies of the rats just fell apart. The females were not so affected, but they were unable to produce live young.

"The medical profession thinks fructose is better for diabetics than sugar," says Dr. Field, "but every cell in the body can metabolize glucose. However, all fructose must be metabolized in the liver. The livers of the rats on the high fructose diet looked like the livers of alcoholics, plugged with fat and cirrhotic."

Going back to the research done by Chi-Tang Ho, his group is also probing the mechanisms by which carbonation increases the amount of reactive carbonyls formed in sodas containing HFCS. They note that non-carbonated fruit juices containing HFCS have one-third the amount of reactive carbonyl species found in carbonated sodas with HFCS, while non-carbonated tea beverages containing high-fructose corn syrup have only about one-sixth the levels of carbonyls found in regular soda.

Views: 10

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Congratulations!
Your post is the forum for today.
Ar Lena
The Sports ePublicist

RSS

© 2014   Created by TheArtiste Hassan.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service